Corn Stoves from Earthinhand

Posted by Pixelhead

Corn Stoves, what the heck are Corn Stoves? Corn stoves are home heaters that heat by burning shelled dry corn. Very similar to a wood pellet stove in operation, but these stoves are made to burn corn which burns at a much higher BTU than wood pellets. The corn stoves can come as stand alone units or can be fireplace inserts.

According to the Corn Stove site Earthinhandcornstoves.com, many wood pellet stove owners in past years,  due to becoming frustrated when they could not find a wood pellets,  tried burning corn in their stoves. John Mills, the owner, said he forewarned the pellet stove owners about burning corn in their pellet stoves, because corn burns so hot that it could melt the fire pot, which is the area where the pellet fuel burns.

In an attempt to help these wood pellet customers cope with winter heating, Earthinhand is carrying wheat pellets this year which may be used as an alternative to wood pellets. The wheat pellets, burn a little hotter than wood pellets, but no where near as hot as shelled corn. Wheat pellets are made out of the waste produced from processing of the wheat grain into a usable form.

Sounds like a great way to help fight the rising energy costs associated with heating a house, but what about the smell? As a kid, I remember burning wood to heat our house during the winter months, and having the house smell like a fireplace. Mr. Mills says the corn stoves are clean burning, because the air that is used to burn the corn is vented directly from the outside. The air that heats the room is vented from the room, and is only as dirty or clean as the air that is already in the room. There is no popcorn smell, but he says, “there is a sweet smell outside from the burning corn, but nothing like burnt popcorn”. For more information on corn burning stoves, visit Earthinhandcornstoves.com, and tell them Pixelhead sent you.

 

UPDATE: The owner of Earthinhandcornstoves.com has since retired, and the domain was purchased by an Asian company.

If you are still looking for corn stove information, you can try the people at Kringsonline.com.

Written by Pixelhead on November 2nd, 2006 with comments disabled.
Read more articles on Environment and Home Improvement and Uncategorized

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

.

Related articles

5 comments

Comments are now disabled for this article, thank you for your participation. Read the comments left by other users below, or:

Get your own gravatar by visiting gravatar.com Seed Exchange
#1. June 18th, 2008, at 1:34 AM.

This is huge! I say…

Our school is in the process of doing trials on corn using an organic plant nutrient that can improve any plants growth by 25%+

We have gotten seeds from the USDA and plan to do sprayed and un-sprayed versions so we can present living examples. The nutrient has been used in Africa with huge success and has just come to the US.

My question after reading this was how do you shell the corn?

Get your own gravatar by visiting gravatar.com Fireplace Designs
#2. January 30th, 2009, at 4:55 AM.

i doubt if there are people using old model of fireplace burning with wood. there are new fireplace system we get in market now, and as we wish we can have them get constructed in our favorite room too. better to look out foe them.

Get your own gravatar by visiting gravatar.com Fireplace Design Ideas
#3. January 30th, 2009, at 9:30 AM.

if its new generation, they would like to go for new fireplaces with many technology. if its our grandfather they will go for one same old which they used in their time. whatever both has to do with your house setup.

Get your own gravatar by visiting gravatar.com Dave
#4. March 6th, 2009, at 1:23 PM.

I’m sorry, you can’t beat the smell of a good old wood burning fireplace. I grew up with one in my parents house though so I’m biased. Good idea though and could save people a lot of money fuel bills!

Get your own gravatar by visiting gravatar.com Paul Hundrieser
#5. October 10th, 2009, at 10:09 PM.

Corn stoves are definitely growing in popularity, especially in farming communities where it’s easy to get a hold of. That was something that was rather frustrating about wood pellet stoves last season…because they were getting so popular, a lot of places were either selling out or raising prices so high.

Wood Pellet Stove Blog

Next